Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is a Hardy and Adaptable Cereal Grain : A Part from The Book : Fortification of Foodstuffs (Food Material) with Moringa oleifera

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is a hardy and adaptable cereal grain that is essential to modern food systems and plays a significant role in tackling several global concerns. It is well known for its capacity to adapt to a wide range of agro-climatic circumstances, including semi-arid and desert areas. It is an essential crop for guaranteeing food security because of its capacity to flourish in arid settings, particularly in areas where climate variability is likely to occur. Sorghum is a staple grain that helps to diversify diets by providing a wealth of vital nutrients. It fills in nutritional gaps that are common in many populations by offering a range of macronutrients, micronutrients, and dietary fiber through ingestion. When compared to other major grains like wheat and maize, sorghum is renowned for using water resources efficiently. Sorghum farming becomes essential for sustainable agricultural operations in areas with limited water resources. Throughout Asia and Africa, sorghum is a staple component in many traditional dishes and drinks with its rich bioactive compounds that may offer health benefits in addition to its nutritional value.

Author(s) Details:

Abiodun Olukemi Famakinwa,
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa.

Oluwafemi Omoniyi Oguntibeju,
Phytomedicine and Phytochemistry Group, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, South Africa.

Victoria Jideani,
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa.

Jessy Van Wyk,
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa.

Anthony Olusegun Obilana,
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa.

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